How Selling Old IT Equipment Can Increase Your Buying Power

How Selling Old IT Equipment Can Increase Your Buying Power

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Once your used IT equipment is ready to be retired, you can start turning it into a brand-new investment to help expand your business. It’s easy to think of the many benefits of buying the latest equipment to grow your IT infrastructure. However, we encourage you to take a minute to think about the countless benefits your company will experience by selling your retired IT assets.

Used IT equipment is almost always valuable to another enterprise looking to grow, and we’ve found that even gear that’s operated in the field for a long time can be refurbished and made beneficial to someone else. Partnering with the right IT asset management firm can make all the difference in getting a high price for your used equipment and even acquiring new equipment you may need.

Working with the right partner can help an organization avoid a long sales process, tough negotiations, and a low price. Just because you’re ready to get rid of old assets that are taking up precious real estate, doesn’t mean you should settle for less.

Take a moment to look at your inventory and figure out a way to sell used IT equipment in a way that’s best for your company. This report will help you with some of that process.

Benefits of Selling Used IT Equipment

When your company decides it time to sell your used IT equipment, don’t just consider the money you’ll get from the sale. Sure, the return on investment is an upside, but there are many other benefits as well. We will go through a few more ways to maximize value that you might not necessarily think of right away.

A few potential areas you can save money by selling used IT equipment includes reductions in maintenance and repair costs, which is common with older equipment. Ultimately, there may also be a reduction in the purchasing of replacement parts. Savings also range from warehousing the equipment and its potential replacements, as well as spare parts and specialty tools that might’ve been needed in the past.

Selling used IT equipment gives organizations an opportunity to improve their IT capabilities simultaneously cutting costs for legacy and end-of-life gear.

Often, companies retire their IT equipment because they’ve outgrown it or switched to services that no longer require it. Most equipment that gets disposed of still has a lot of useful life, not because there’s something wrong with it. So, by trading or selling used equipment, you are actually supporting another company to grow at an affordable rate with quality equipment.

By selling used equipment — as opposed to throwing it away — a company can highlight its green initiatives and ensure that no equipment ends up in a landfill contributing to the world’s e-waste problems.

There are also ways to limit the number of suppliers you need to work with. This can help a business save both time and money by reducing their team to only trusted and verified partners. When you can find a trustworthy partner to sell your IT equipment to, and buy from the same partner, it creates a one-stop IT shop. Another bonus to selling and buying from the same IT asset partner is that they most likely have an existing network to find other legacy equipment you may need.

We highly recommend finding a partner with experience in used IT equipment because it can make the process easier with a higher rate of return.

Exclusive Benefits of Working With DTC

As a used IT equipment purchaser and IT asset provider, we give businesses considerable access to a full range of equipment and services.

Whether your organization is completing an infrastructure overhaul, or just updating your current set up, we’ve got a wide range of equipment and expertise to help you along the way.

With more than 50 years in the IT equipment industry, we have a thorough knowledge of the procurement process and can work with your team to assist with any data destruction services they may need. We are a family owned company and treat our customers like family.

Data security and customer service have been our top priorities since we opened our doors. Our diverse knowledge-base and experiences, allow our clients to utilize our purchasing and sales personnel as a valued resource for questions, research, and answers.

Another reason companies really like working with us is that our vast database and the contact list of customers, resellers, recyclers, suppliers, and industry partners allows us to find the best price when sourcing your IT equipment.

Our spotless reputation ensures your transactions are handled efficiently, ethically, and securely.  With all of the transactions we’ve processed, we have never had one security breach or data loss.

Things to Look for in an IT Asset Partner

When thinking about how to sell used IT equipment, it’s always best to create a profile of the companies you want to partner with. Building a blueprint allows you to know what questions to ask, identify gaps, compare costs and ensure that they can meet your specific needs.

To help in creating your list, here are some of the considerations we suggest for people who are thinking about selling use IT equipment:

  • What type of excess or used equipment do they purchase?
  • What is their payment process and how long does it take?
  • What types of services do they offer?
  • How long have they been in business and do they have referrals readily available?
  • Do they have flexible payment and other agreement options, including account credit that can be applied to other equipment?
  • What is their warranty and return policy?
  • Who handles the shipping and logistics?
 

These are just a few of the main things we think you should consider for any IT equipment sales partner.

Environmental Benefits of Selling Used IT Equipment

It is a known fact that up to 85% of retired e-waste that gets thrown away ends up in landfills or fiery incinerators, exposing the environment to toxic elements. IT equipment only makes up a tiny fraction of the total e-waste thrown away each year, but accounts for 70% of toxic waste that’s released in the environment.

Only 15% of e-waste was properly reclaimed, meaning companies and governments were able to recover $7.4 billion in 2014. The 85% of e-waste not properly reclaimed or recycled represents a loss of $40.6 billion in assets! That’s a huge economic impact!

Recycling is good for the environment. According to an EPA report, recycling 1 million laptops saves the energy equivalent of the power 3,500 U.S. homes will use in an entire year. Electronics, especially IT equipment, are full of valuable copper, silver, gold,  and palladium. They’re also full of silicon and a variety of heavy metals and chemicals that will leach into groundwater and soil, polluting and poisoning the environment. You can help avoid some of this harm by working with a used IT equipment buyer to limit hazardous materials from entering landfills and dumps.

How to Sell Used IT Equipment

There are many different channels you can use to sell your used IT equipment. Different vendors, personal sale service and recycling options will yield different challenges and returns on your initial investment, so it’s best to consider each option carefully.

DTC has IT equipment experts that are available to work with you to develop a plan to maximize the profitability of your used IT equipment, whether you’re looking to sell it for cash or trade it for the equipment you need to grow your infrastructure.

We provide a reliable way for you to sell excess equipment, remove outdated equipment, or implement the latest tech your customers demand. We handle all the shipping and logistics so your company can save money and difficulties along the way, focusing instead on how to grow your business that matters most to your customers. Never worry about how to sell used IT equipment again.

Data Security in Online Banking

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In today’s world of banking it seems as if everything is done online. Having digital records of all your financial assets is a great idea, if done correctly. 

However, one risk that online banking faces and isn’t talked about very much about –is the possibility that bad players can do great harm to the financial data.

We’ve all heard about the risks of ransomware attacks, but what would happen if a bad apple within the organization were to “delete” all the institutions data? Not only would mass panic and chaos ensue, but the consequences would be overwhelming.

Thanks to this amazing thing we call the internet, there are more ways than ever to hack a bank. According to report by Positive Technologies, banks are just as prone as any other institution to cyberattacks. In fact, hackers often get credentials through phishing scams.

The report shows that “employees at 75% of banks reviewed had clicked on links in phishing messages, and those at 25% of banks entered their credentials in a fake authentication form.”

While banks have suitable solutions for recovering from normal events such as natural disasters, blackouts, and human error; they have a lot of learning to do in being able to survive and quickly recover from a cyberattack.

Online Banks Protecting Data

How can a bank’s data be protected? The answer is far more complex than investing in the best cybersecurity systems. Banks already spend vast amounts on IT security, in some cases more than three times the amount of nonfinancial institutions.

In addition, banks are mindful to protect data by backing it up. Data backups are created using multiple copies of critical data such as customer transactions.

Some of those copies are recorded at the time the transaction occurs and others are recorded every hour, day, or week. Several of the backups use databases or application technologies, whereas others use traditional or cloud storage.

If somehow hackers gained authorizations to the storage system itself, they could possibly corrupt or erase the critical data or all the copies of that data. 

Banks should have off-site recovery plans in place like tape backups. However, those take time to get online, and might not include the most recent customer transactions since they’re kept in an offline state. So, if hackers can just as easily destroy backup data as they can original data, what can banks do to protect their customer’s data?

In order to ensure data security and survive a cyberattack that intends to erase critical data, banks should observe to the following protocols:

  1. Identify the critical data that is required for operating the business. Obviously no business critical data should be labeled as unimportant, but you should be able to identify which data is deemed absolutely necessary to keep the business afloat. That data should have multiple backups in multiple locations.
  2. What is the resiliency for each data type Ask yourself, how long will it take the business to recover if any data is destroyed? Depending on the data that is lost, it could take hours, days, or even weeks to fully recover. How much revenue would be lost in that time?
  3. Create an infrastructure that provides the level of protection your business needs.A smart data protection strategy is to regularly backup data to WORM or write-once, read-many storage devices. This guarantees that data cannot be overwritten or corrupted. Such data storage devices should be secured with credentials that are only available during non-business hours.
  4. Always confirm that the cyber-recoverability requirements are correctly executed in your infrastructure.It is imperative to confirm after each change, upgrade, update, or modification, which takes place in your IT infrastructure that the recovery requirements are still intact and understood by all stakeholders.

Is ITAD a Weak Link in Data Security?

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Is ITAD a Weak Link in Data Security?

Let’s face it, the amount of data currently being created on a day to day basis isn’t slowing down anytime in the near future.

With the increase in data comes newer, faster equipment with even more vast amounts of storage capacity.

Not only does that create a problem of what to do with the old assets, but more importantly how to keep them secure in the process.

A recent report from Experian revealed that nearly thirty percent of organizations don’t have plans in place to deal with data security threats.

You heard that right. According to their research that’s almost one third of businesses!

With cyber security threats from ransomware attacks to hard drives being sold online that still contain left behind data, how can any business not comprehend the risk that poorly managed data creates?

In more recent times, we’ve seen cyber security being prioritized as an area of great investment; especially with a majority of new businesses and startups in the data hosting sector.  

But ponder for a moment the amount of retired IT assets that end up in piles of scrap as new products are released on a continuous basis.

Whether it be an entire machine, such as laptops, desktops, and networking switches or individual components like SSDs, HDDs, memory, or tape cartridges, any small to mid-sized business produces a significant amount of physical data assets that need to be securely destroyed on a regular basis.

Unfortunately, end of life asset management and the secure destruction of data assets is often unnoticed.

An insufficient amount of businesses can guarantee or show proof that every measure possible was taken to prevent a data breach. 

Too few organizations can confidently state that all sensitive data was destroyed in a secure, accountable and socially responsible way.

When the General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) came into legislature in May 2018, businesses began facing potential financial penalties if they didn’t comply with the data destruction guidelines.

 

data center energy efficiency

An organization that deal with or governs sensitive data should have an obligation to teach their staff about GDPR requirements and responsibilities. 

In order to stay ahead of the curve, businesses should also be making an effort to transform employee habbits when it comes to data asset destruction.

However, this can be a costly and timely process. Processes and policies in regards to asset and data disposition need to be communicated clearly to staff, resulting in the gradual education and behavioral change.

The decisions any organization has to make when choosing on an ITAD vendor are going depend on the size of the company and its equipment inventory.

Nevertheless, a business can adopt its own plan and strategy to fit its individual ITAD requirements, but the most important thing that must remain is taking an active part in the security of critical data.

Trusting the help of a reputable ITAD vendor makes a huge difference. There are countless security measures that a business may not think to take into account. 

A professional ITAD company will to ensure your data is properly secure from start to finish.

Since 1965, we’ve been in the business of helping organizations with all of their IT asset needs. 

With over 130 years combined industry experience, our equipment experts can assist in offloading old or retired hardware fast, easy, and even more importantly SECURELY.

When considering selling surplus IT equipment, visit one of our pages; We Buy Used IT EquipmentWe Buy Used MemoryWe Buy Used Hard Drives, We Buy Used Cisco, or We Buy Used Tape to get the highest market value and the greatest return on investment. 

Contact us today for a free quote and see why we’ve been trusted by businesses both large and small for over half a century.

13 IT Dad Jokes

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Father’s have taught us many things, but telling jokes may not be one of them. Here are a few of our favorite “IT” dad jokes to get you through the holiday….

Don’t use “beef stew” as a computer password.

It’s not stroganoff.

 

 

Did you hear about the monkeys who shared an Amazon account?

They were Prime mates.

 

 

What does Apple call its new iPhone chargers?

Apple Juice

 

 

Have you heard of that new band “1023 Megabytes”?

They’re pretty good, but they don’t have a gig just yet.

 

 

I just got fired from my job at the keyboard factory.

They told me I wasn’t putting in enough shifts.

 

 

My computer suddenly started singing “Someone Like You.”

It’s a Dell.

 

 

Why did the computer show up at work late?

It had a hard drive.

 

 

Why did the CPU go broke?

A reboot cleared out all of its cache.

 

 

What are computers’ favorite snacks?

Microchips, phish sticks, and cookies. But just a few bytes of each.

 

 

What do computers do at the beach?

Put on some spam block for protection so they can safely surf the net while catching some WAVs!

 

 

Where do computers go to dance?

The disk-o.

 

 

Why did the IT guy’s mom yawn?

Because he made his Mother Bored.

ASCDI podcast

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ASCDI Podcast: Meet DTC Computer Supplies, a company dedicated to the secondary market

New to the AscdiNatd, DTC Computer Supplies is a family owned company specializing in buying and selling IT equipment that offers a deep bench of experience in the industry, and especially in data storage products. In this podcast, Norm Hutton, Wholesale Purchasing and Sales with DTC, gives us a look at the new ASCDI member. Hutton discusses how DTC offers many services including quantity discounts, same day shipping, blind and double blind drop shipments, in-house labeling and initialization, free EDP Tri-Optic barcode labels with any tape purchase and a deep inventory of products. We learn about DTC’s exclusive Phoenix Rejuvenation Process. Hutton describes DTC’s used tape and IT equipment buyback programs.